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ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY Honors (1.0) credit

This course is a system-by-system exploratory study of the human body. Content and activities focus on the structure and function of body system components and their interrelationships in health and disease. Coursework includes the use of medical terminology, discussion of many disease conditions, injuries, disorders, surgical and medical interventions, and current trends. The course provides an overview of the material and organ dissection, with more in-depth study and cat dissection at the honors level.

 BIOLOGY I (1.0) credit

This course expands and refines biological concepts, including the scientific method, measurement, lab safety cell biology, reproduction, genetics, microbiology, biological changes, classification and taxonomy, structure and functions of plants and animals, ecological relationships and human systems are studied.

Biology 1 Honors (1.0) credit

While the content focus of this course is consistent with the Biology I course, students will explore these concepts in greater depth. In general, the academic pace and rigor will be greatly increased for honors level course work. Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are an integral part of this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that at the high school level, all students should be in the science lab or field, collecting data every week. School laboratory investigations (labs) are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3). Laboratory investigations in the high school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work, as well as the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement error; and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (National Research Council, 2006, p.77; NSTA,


CHEMISTRY 1  
(1.0) credit 

This course provides students with the study of the composition, properties, and changes associated with matter. Content includes classification and structure of matter, atomic theory, periodic table, bonding, chemical formulas, chemical and balanced equations, behavior of gasses, physical changes, acids, bases and salts.

Chemistry 1 Honors  (1.0) credit 

While the content focus of this course is consistent with the Chemistry I course, students will explore these concepts in greater depth. In general, the academic pace and rigor will be greatly increased for honors level course work. Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are an integral part of this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that at the high school level, all students should be in the science lab or field, collecting data every week. School laboratory investigations (labs) are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3). Laboratory investigations in the high school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work, as well as the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement error; and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (National Research Council, 2006, p.77; NSTA,

 

PHYSICS I (1.0) credit

Provides students an introductory mathematical and conceptual study of the theories and laws governing the interaction of matter, energy, and the forces of nature. Course content consists of topics such as energy, work, power, dynamics, heat and thermodynamics, wave theory, optics, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear physics. Laboratory activities are a large component of this class, and participation in lab work required.

Physics 1 Honors (1.0) credit

While the content focus of this course is consistent with the Physics I course, students will explore these concepts in greater depth. In general, the academic pace and rigor will be greatly increased for honors level course work. Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are an integral part of this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that at the high school level, all students should be in the science lab or field, collecting data every week. School laboratory investigations (labs) are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3). Laboratory investigations in the high school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work, as well as the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement error; and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (National Research Council, 2006, p.77; NSTA, 2007)

International Baccalaureate Mid Yrs Prog Chemistry (1.0) credit

International Baccalaureate Physics 1 Course introduces students to the laws of physics, the experimental skills required in physics, and the social and historical aspects of physics as an evolving body of human knowledge about nature. Topics covered include: Mechanics, Thermodynamics, Waves, Electricity & Magnetism, and Atomic and Nuclear Physics. Length: FY Credits: 1.0 Area: EQ 2003845 International Baccalaureate Physics 2 Course introduces students to the laws of physics, the experimental skills required in physics, and the social and historical aspects of physics as an evolving body of human knowledge about nature. Topics covered include: Mechanics, Thermodynamics, Waves, Electricity & Magnetism, and Atomic and Nuclear Physics.

 

Forensic Science 1 (1.0) credit

Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are an integral part of this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that at the high school level, all students should be in the science lab or field, collecting data every week. School laboratory investigations (labs) are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3). Laboratory investigations in the high school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work, as well as the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement error; and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (National Research Council, 2006, p.77; NSTA, 2007)

 

 

Marine Science 1 (1.0) credit

Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are an integral part of this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that at the high school level, all students should be in the science lab or field, collecting data every week. School laboratory investigations (labs) are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3). Laboratory investigations in the high school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work, as well as the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement error; and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (National Research Council, 2006, p.77; NSTA, 2007).

Marine Science 1 Honors (1.0) credit

While the content focus of this course is consistent with the Marine Science I course, students will explore these concepts in greater depth. In general, the academic pace and rigor will be greatly increased for honors level course work. Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are an integral part of this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that at the high school level, all students should be in the science lab or field, collecting data every week. School laboratory investigations (labs) are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3). Laboratory investigations in the high school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work, as well as the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement error; and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (National Research Council, 2006, p.77; NSTA, 2007) 

Anatomy and Physiology Honors (1.0) credit

While the content focus of this course is consistent with the Anatomy and Physiology course, students will explore these concepts in greater depth. In general, the academic pace and rigor will be greatly increased for honors level course work. Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are an integral part of this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that at the high school level, all students should be in the science lab or field, collecting data every week. School laboratory investigations (labs) are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or the field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3). Laboratory investigations in the high school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work, as well as the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement error; and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (National Research Council, 2006, p.77; NSTA, 2007).

International Baccalaureate Biology 1 (1.0) credit

Learners should gain a positive attitude towards science while recognizing that its contribution can have both positive and negative consequences. IB science also involves the development of an appreciation of the scientific contributions of people from different cultures and backgrounds.

International Baccalaureate Biology 2 (1.0) credit

The focus of IB Biology HL is to create citizens of the world who understand universal human values. IB Biology HL is a two year course that encompasses the coursework and laboratory experiences that will prepare students for the IB Biology HL examination. The course includes the following core topics: 1) Cells, 2) Chemistry of Life 3) Genetics, 4) Ecology & Evolution, 5) Human Health & Physiology. For Biology HL, additional topics include: Nucleic Acids and Protein, Cell Respiration and Photosynthesis, Human Genetics and Reproduction, Nerve muscles & movement, Excretion, and Plant Science.

International Baccalaureate Mid Yrs Prog Biology (1.0) credit

Advanced Placement Environmental Science (1.0) credit

The AP Environmental Science course is designed to be the equivalent of a one-semester, introductory college course in environmental science, through which students engage with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world. The course requires that students identify and analyze natural and human-made environmental problems, evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Environmental Science is interdisciplinary, embracing topics from geology, biology, environmental studies, environmental science, chemistry, and geography.